Alice Sheridan, Furzedown

Furzedown acrylic on wood 20 x 50 cm

Alice Sheridan is a landscape painter whose work has a simple finesse to it and I find it incredibly engaging. 

She is a fellow traveller with me in Alyson Stanfield’s Artbiz Bootcamp and I would like to share her vision of the world with you.

Her landscapes have a simple flow to them and the palette is similarly uncomplicated. In the painting Furzedown, above, Alice has used an analogous palette to great effect, blending many shades of green in a restful way, I find this painting uplifting, even though it has a stormy sort of sky to it.  The line of light on the horizon keeps drawing my eye back into the work.

 

Alice Sheridan,Hiding In The Hedges

Hiding In The Hedges acrylic 40 x 40cm Sold

 

She says of her work “My starting point is always a real place; a way of looking at our surroundings… but each drawing and step towards the finished piece allows me to interpret this in a different way.” 

Alice Sheridan,Gold On Heather

Gold On Heather Acrylic on wood 20 x 20cm

Alice further states.”An awareness of our surrounding and how they affect our mood is the starting point for my painting. The landscape may be the starting point but it is also a means by which we notice the beauty in our surroundings.”  I particularly resonate with the last sentence.  One of the things artists do is bring to others, an awareness of things in their ‘ordinary’ surroundings that they never normally see. They raise our awareness to ‘beauty’ within the commonplace.

This Weeks Question: What extra-ordinary things can you see in your surroundings? 

Look For Next Week’s Post: Whats happening in the Studio this month?

Pix Credits: Images used with permission from Alice Sheridan

Charcoal Drawings

Charcoal Drawings

Charcoal Drawings were the flavour of the moment last week as I was playing around with a new series I’m embarking on. This series will still be in the New Romantic genre. These charcoal drawings were developed from an idea wherein I was exploring, how the idea of the heart might fit into an actual landscape. The drawings were done using willow charcoal, a pretty flexible medium – messy but favourable.  I use the willow in favour of compressed charcoal which comes in much fatter sticks and tends to go rather too dark, you don’t get as bigger range of tones out of it.  It is not as flexible to use.

charcoal drawings,Landscapes of the heart I - Kadira Jennings

Landscapes of the Heart I

 

I am thinking about turning this painting below into either version of these drawings.

charcoal drawings inspiration for Mt Taranaki

Mt Taranaki

 

charcoal drawings,Landscapes of the heart II

Landscapes of the Heart II

 

Keep an eye out for the end result in the coming weeks!

Next Thursday’s Post: Mt Taranaki revisited

Next Monday’s Post: What Shall I Create?

Posted By: Kadira Jennings

The Dragon And His Mistress

This painting ‘The Dragon And His Mistress’,  is one of those works that seemed like a good idea at the time …… and then you look at it later, scratching your head and saying to yourself – “What was I thinking?”  It is what it is, but sometimes I wonder where these things come from.  Well it did come from a photo of a deep chasm, however it decided to do it’s own thing and become something else!

The Dragon and His Mistress Oil painting by Kadira Jennings

The Dragon and His Mistress 33″x24″

 

The colour is extraordinarily intense – perhaps I was just having an ‘intense’ day.  Colour seems to be something that just flows out of me, regardless of what I’m thinking.  It is instinctual, it is spiritual and yes, it is intense – mostly. I find it very difficult to paint wafty, high key, paintings with little tonal difference. An example of which is below in Monet’s painting of Charing Cross Bridge. Don’t get me wrong, Monet’s painting is a wonderful example of a high key painting, it’s just not my thing to paint them.

The Dragon And His Mistress compared to Charing Cross Bridge  Monet

Charing Cross Bridge Monet

 

Next Thursday’s Post: ‘The Love Birds’

Posted By: Kadira Jennings

***!!!!HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!!***

Well here we are at the tag end of another year again.  If you are reading this, then I guess the world didn’t end on Sat 21 Dec and we can all look forward to another wonderfully creative year. To acknowledge and celebrate the creativity of my students I am going to share some of the wonderful  work they have done with me in the past year.

Bessie - Steve (Oils)

Bessie – Steve (Oils)

They are all to be commended on their perseverance and commitment to their art.  Creativity is seldom easy and we often have to fight for our right to nurture our creative spirit, as others often view it as an indulgence rather than an essential part of who  we are.  The other thing about that is that when you pursue your creativity, it makes others uncomfortable, because they aren’t honouring their own creativity. So congratulations to everyone who has nurtured their own creativity this last year!

Sunset – Ash (Acrylics)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Courtney – Humming Bird (Pastel)

 

 

 

 

 

Jess - Pen & Ink Study

Jess – Pen & Ink Study

 

 

 

 

Elise – Kapati Coast (Pastel)

 

 

Summer Scents - Deborah (Oils)

Summer Scents – Deborah (Oils)

 

Faith – Tonal Study (Oils

 

 

Skull Study - Rewa (Charcoal)

Skull Study – Rewa (Charcoal)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jo – Pencil Drawing

Lee – Pelican (Pen & Ink)

 

 

 

 

 

Kandinsky Tree - Louis (Acrylics)

Kandinsky Tree – Louis (Acrylics)

 

 

Lorraine - Poppies (Oils)

Lorraine – Poppies (Oils)

 

 

 

 

 

Lorraine O’Day – My Dog (pastels)

 

 

 

 

 

Pumpkin - Merran (Water Colour)

Pumpkin – Merran (Water Colour)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are just a few of the wonderful works from my students this year. It should be noted that while these works are all original works by the students, some of them are copies of other photographers and artists and are intended as learning exercises only. Thank you all for allowing me to work with you and guide you on your creative journeys.

Grace - Chay

Grace – Chay

I wish all of you, students and readers, an amazingly creative year in 2013 and trust that you will continue to grow and expand your creative horizons all year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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