diving_deeper_into _your_art_practice, kadira_jennings

What Does It Take To Dive Deeper Into Your Art Practice?

Deepen Your Art Practice a free group hosted by me on Facebook.
It is a place for artists of all stages to Dive Deeper, Create and Connect –
If you want to dive deeper into your Art Practice and learn to create powerful artworks while balancing your creative and business energies, come over and join in the conversation at  Deepen Your Art Practice.

Why would you want to Join this group? As you know, there are a lot of art groups out there and what is one more artist’s group? Well, one of the things I noticed that was lacking was a group that really goes deeper into an artist’s life and their Art Practice.  Most groups out there are sharing paintings, business tips and techniques.  I feel that the most important side of our Art Practice is being neglected, so I established this group to start the conversation around what is, really important.

A lot of this conversation will focus on topics like:

  • What it means to be an artist.
  • How do we manage those internal conflicts that arise between our normal life and our artlife?
  • The power of gratitude.
  • Looking at the pros and cons of working in a series.
  • What happens when we only ‘paint to sell’ 
  • The conflict between what we want to paint and what we think we should paint.

 

Dive Deeper Into Your Art Practice,artists painting photo

 

  • How does the medium I choose to paint in reflect what my soul is trying to express?

These topics are just a few of the areas I plan to open a discussion on.

What Is The Biggest Colour Mixing Challenge For Artists?

I have spent many years teaching people to paint. During that time, I found the biggest colour mixing  challenge is understanding clearly, why colours give the results they do. For this reason I have developed a series of colour mixing workshops to address this problem.

No More Mud – Colour Mixing Workshops

colour mixing challenge,colour mixing,sorkshops,art workshops

 

The colour mixing challenge is one of the most difficult things an artist  has to do.  Even an artist who has been painting for some while can still have problems with getting just the right colour and there is always more to learn. To begin with, one must learn the basic colour mixing principles which are a lot more complicated than,  yellow and blue make green.

In February and March this year 2017 I will be holding two colour workshops.

In the Introductory Workshop you will learn:
  • The basics—so you can understand why you get a particular colour from different colour combinations.
  • This workshop will give you a strong grounding in the science of colour mixing. Without this basic understanding you will always find it difficult to mix the colour that you want.
  • You will gain colour mixing experience and understand the differences between Primary, Secondary and Tertiary colours.
  • We will take a look at complementary colours and why they are important.
  • You will learn about the differences between tone, colour, hue and why things happen the way they do.
  • This workshop will provide you with a beginning understanding of the colour mixing challenge and set you on your way to controlling colour confidently.

In the Advanced Workshop you will learn:

The second colour workshop will cover more advanced colour mixing knowledge. In order to attend this workshop you will have had to have done the introductory workshop first.

  • More on colour values
  • Mixing dominant and subordinate colour
  • Abstract Complementaries
  • Colour discords
  • Analogous colours and split complementaries
  • The psychology of colour
  • We will look at relationships between colours, how they affect each other and how you can use this to your advantage.

These workshops will be for a full day and will be held on the following dates:

Introductory workshop Sunday February 19th

Advanced workshop Sunday March 5th

HOW MUCH IS MY INVESTMENT? : Full Price $215 for each workshop

EARLY BIRD PAYMENT FOR FIRST WORKSHOP: Closes Feb 5th.

EARLY BIRD PAYMENT FOR SECOND WORKSHOP:  Closes Feb

Early Bird Payment is $190 each workshop. If you book for both workshops you will receive a further $10 discount on the total. Your total payment therefore will be $370.

A Payment plan is also available. You may spread the payments over 3, monthly payments of $80 per month for each workshop.

TIME: Workshops are from 9am—4pm. It is a full day so you will need to bring lunch. Morning and afternoon tea are provided.

VENUE: Studio 1—60 Maitland Rd, Springfield

WHAT TO BRING: Once you have paid you will receive a follow-up email with details of what you will need to bring. If you have any questions, please call or email me.

NB: When you have booked please email me that you have done so and I will email you a list of the materials you will need to bring.

CONTACT DETAILS: Kadira Ph: 04144 38121 or email kadira@artclassescentralcoast.com

 

These workshops fill fast!! So if you are contemplating doing it – please don’t think about it too long.

NB: When you make a payment please email me that you have done so and I will email you a list of the materials you will need to bring.

kadira@artclassescentralcoast.com

TIMES: Both Workshops are from 9am—4pm. It is a full day so you will need to bring lunch.  Morning and afternoon tea are provided.

VENUE: Studio 1—60 Maitland Rd, Springfield

WHAT TO BRING: Once you have paid your deposit you will receive a follow-up email with details of what you will need to bring.  If you have any questions, please call or email me.

These workshops fill fast!! So if you are contemplating doing it – please don’t think about it too long.

The bank details are below –

Please put your FIRST NAME, LAST INITIAL and the following codes depending on what you are attending ….    WKSHP I, WKSHP II  or BOTH WKSHP on your deposit information.

 

NAME: Art Classes Central Coast

BANK: (Westpac Erina) 

BSB: 032564

A/C:  255662

 

If you have any questions — please call me…. Kadira—04144 38121 however please note I will be unavailable to take calls between 7th – 21st April.

I’m looking forward to seeing you there!

What some previous participants had to say about the workshops:
  • “Great place for me to start. Lots of practice to do at home. I will definitely come for more workshops.” Kim C
  • “Definitely informative – practical info that will definitely be used and referred to in class and future art works.  Great to learn basics.”  Stephanie M
  • “Really helpful learning, fun and relaxed environment.  I’d definitely recommend this workshop to others.  The stand out for me? ‘The Book’ – a great reference to keep and the ‘hands on’ which helped to bring the learning to life. ” Marg H
Ignite Your Art Practice To New Levels

Now how might I do that – ignite my art practice to new levels?

To understand this, you must first understand what an artist’s practice is.

Your art practice refers to both the conceptual and making processes of an artwork. Below are some thoughts and questions about the content and quality of an art practice.  What drives it and what kind of things should be considered? 

It examines:

  • How you develop your ideas,and concepts
  • What the influences both global and personal are, that impact your art making?
  • How do other artists and their movements inform your art practice?
  • This process is about how you define and refine ideas.  How do you develop and come to recognise your own style?
  • Is your practice about personal, societal or global issues?
  • Do you experiment with new ideas, media or technical challenges?
  • Do you  experiment and challenge your  audience? How do you help your audience to gain entrance into the meaning behind your works?
  • Is your work political, meditative or a rebellion? 

 

art practice,graffiti

 

The way we work as artists and the meaning behind our work is often driven by a deep desire to express something within us that words just fail to express. 

Once you gain an understanding of the subtleties that underpin your practice you then have the power to create an impactful story with your artwork. This is how you ignite your art practice to new and more powerful levels. Gaining deep insight into your own processes helps  you more clearly put your passion and your power out onto the canvas.

 

This Weeks Question: Can you identify the main elements in your own art practice?

Look For Next Week’s Post: See Frida Kahlo now! Be astonished, amazed and delighted!

 

 

Photo by Daquella manera

My Art Practice
Dark, Petals Falling,kadira Jennings, Creative Practice

Dark, Petals Falling

My art practice involves many things, not just putting the brush to canvas. An important aspect of it is always learning and there are many areas the learning must take place. One of these areas as I mentioned on Instagram this week is the course I am doing at the moment with Cory Huff from the The Abundant Artist.  In the second module, the exercise we had to do this week was to complete a painting in one hour. Of course I went into panic mode. This is not an easy thing to do. (Not the panicking lol that’s easy !!) However what I did get out of it, although not a great painting, was a lot more insight into understanding my working process and what I really need to do before I begin I work.

The other thing this exercise did, was to give me a chance to experiment with some ideas that have been floating around in my head for a while.  Funnily enough one of these things is about exactly that – floating. I am fascinated with the way things can be made to float in space and this is something I would like to experiment with,more in my work. You may have seen the paintings below, which were playing with this concept in a different way.

Studio news,Floating Free

Floating Free 22 x 22″
Oils On Canvas

 

Floating Free incorporates these elements using the devices of tone, colour and shadows to achieve a floating effect.

Where as Suspension, below, takes an object itself that is actually floating in a three dimensional space.  What I am drawn to in this act of suspension is the way it seems to spend time itself and enters us into a timeless realm or space.

creative practice,Kadira Jennings,my art practice

Suspension oil on Canvas 40×40″

 

One of the things I’m finding that I really have to do is to put aside time for the thinking and development side of things. When I trained as an artist years ago there was not much emphasis put on the importance of one’s art practice and so I have always tended to ignore it somewhat, instead just going on intuition. But I’m finding now that I need to pay more attention to this neglected area my creative practice.

I am finding that as I grow as an artist, my art practice continues to expand. There is always something you need to learn. At the moment I am really focusing on finding my collectors or tribe, the people who appreciate and buy my art.

This Weeks Question: What kinds of things are you attracted to in an art work?

Look For Next Week’s Post: Follow the development of my latest artwork.

 

Creative Practice – Part II

Creative practice  is incorporated in a theme that I have often spoken of on the blog, this is the idea of the Artist Date. The issues I spoke of in the previous post speak directly to the value of the artist date. Why, because when you are on an artist date,  you are a lot more present and you are consciously seeking things that are going to fire your inspiration. You are putting yourselves in environments that you love, or sometimes that challenge, but generally are going to ignite your creative juices.

So to return to how one works up in image, in my own art practice I will often put an image into Photoshop and then play around with it until it feels right, and I may or may not do drawings from this. Sometimes I will print the images out and then do draw on top of the printed images for things that I haven’t been able to deal with in the computer space.

Creative Practice

Creative Practice in action

When I’m happy with the composition, I will then begin drawing the image up on the canvas.

Here is the finished painting…

creative practice,Kadira Jennings

Suspension oil on Canvas 40×40″

Another element of art practice that relates directly to creating images is looking at other art work, whether this is work of the great masters, children’s art, or works on display in a local gallery. Our inspiration comes from many sources. We can look at how another artist has dealt with, for example,  light on fabric and apply the same principles in our own work. In fact in Europe there is a time honoured tradition for artists to go into galleries and make sketches and copy the works of the great masters in order to learn and study how they executed what they did. This makes life a lot easier, because you don’t have to keep reinventing the wheel. So we all have much to be thankful for in terms of our  predecessor artists and their contribution to our understanding of how to create an art work.

This Weeks Question: Have you identified the elements of your creative practice that work the best for you?

Look For Next Week’s PostArt Processes – a look at uncertainty as part of our art practice.

I’d like to take a further look at this question from the last post in a bit more depth.

  • What does being an artist really mean to me?

Here are some thoughts on that topic.

As you go through these ideas, pay very close attention to how you ‘feel’ as you read each statement. Take your time and really understand what your body is telling you about the statement.  This is the true indicator of where you stand on the matter.  If you read one and feel a slight discomfort in the pit of your stomach or solar plexus  – you are being given an indicator that something is not quite right – examine that in more depth.

Perhaps the first thing is to define what you mean by the term  ‘artist’.  Is it someone who:

  • Makes a living from their art and works full time at it?
  • Just loves to create and doesn’t care about creating income from their art?
  • Works part time arting and is employed in a job as well and  is happy with that?
  • Is content doing their art form as a hobby?
  • Needs others approval to feel that ‘I am a real artist’.
  • Feels that, ‘I am an artist, deep within myself regardless of what others might think.’
  • Has a unique style, something that separates them from others in their field.  Is that even important to them?
Artists Palette ©2010 Kadira Jennings

Artists Palette ©2010 Kadira Jennings

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