What Is The Biggest Colour Mixing Challenge For Artists?

I have spent many years teaching people to paint. During that time, I found the biggest colour mixing  challenge is understanding clearly, why colours give the results they do. For this reason I have developed a series of colour mixing workshops to address this problem.

No More Mud – Colour Mixing Workshops

colour mixing challenge,colour mixing,sorkshops,art workshops

 

The colour mixing challenge is one of the most difficult things an artist  has to do.  Even an artist who has been painting for some while can still have problems with getting just the right colour and there is always more to learn. To begin with, one must learn the basic colour mixing principles which are a lot more complicated than,  yellow and blue make green.

In February and March this year 2017 I will be holding two colour workshops.

In the Introductory Workshop you will learn:
  • The basics—so you can understand why you get a particular colour from different colour combinations.
  • This workshop will give you a strong grounding in the science of colour mixing. Without this basic understanding you will always find it difficult to mix the colour that you want.
  • You will gain colour mixing experience and understand the differences between Primary, Secondary and Tertiary colours.
  • We will take a look at complementary colours and why they are important.
  • You will learn about the differences between tone, colour, hue and why things happen the way they do.
  • This workshop will provide you with a beginning understanding of the colour mixing challenge and set you on your way to controlling colour confidently.

In the Advanced Workshop you will learn:

The second colour workshop will cover more advanced colour mixing knowledge. In order to attend this workshop you will have had to have done the introductory workshop first.

  • More on colour values
  • Mixing dominant and subordinate colour
  • Abstract Complementaries
  • Colour discords
  • Analogous colours and split complementaries
  • The psychology of colour
  • We will look at relationships between colours, how they affect each other and how you can use this to your advantage.

These workshops will be for a full day and will be held on the following dates:

Introductory workshop Sunday February 19th

Advanced workshop Sunday March 5th

HOW MUCH IS MY INVESTMENT? : Full Price $215 for each workshop

EARLY BIRD PAYMENT FOR FIRST WORKSHOP: Closes Feb 5th.

EARLY BIRD PAYMENT FOR SECOND WORKSHOP:  Closes Feb

Early Bird Payment is $190 each workshop. If you book for both workshops you will receive a further $10 discount on the total. Your total payment therefore will be $370.

A Payment plan is also available. You may spread the payments over 3, monthly payments of $80 per month for each workshop.

TIME: Workshops are from 9am—4pm. It is a full day so you will need to bring lunch. Morning and afternoon tea are provided.

VENUE: Studio 1—60 Maitland Rd, Springfield

WHAT TO BRING: Once you have paid you will receive a follow-up email with details of what you will need to bring. If you have any questions, please call or email me.

NB: When you have booked please email me that you have done so and I will email you a list of the materials you will need to bring.

CONTACT DETAILS: Kadira Ph: 04144 38121 or email kadira@artclassescentralcoast.com

 

These workshops fill fast!! So if you are contemplating doing it – please don’t think about it too long.

NB: When you make a payment please email me that you have done so and I will email you a list of the materials you will need to bring.

kadira@artclassescentralcoast.com

TIMES: Both Workshops are from 9am—4pm. It is a full day so you will need to bring lunch.  Morning and afternoon tea are provided.

VENUE: Studio 1—60 Maitland Rd, Springfield

WHAT TO BRING: Once you have paid your deposit you will receive a follow-up email with details of what you will need to bring.  If you have any questions, please call or email me.

These workshops fill fast!! So if you are contemplating doing it – please don’t think about it too long.

The bank details are below –

Please put your FIRST NAME, LAST INITIAL and the following codes depending on what you are attending ….    WKSHP I, WKSHP II  or BOTH WKSHP on your deposit information.

 

NAME: Art Classes Central Coast

BANK: (Westpac Erina) 

BSB: 032564

A/C:  255662

 

If you have any questions — please call me…. Kadira—04144 38121 however please note I will be unavailable to take calls between 7th – 21st April.

I’m looking forward to seeing you there!

What some previous participants had to say about the workshops:
  • “Great place for me to start. Lots of practice to do at home. I will definitely come for more workshops.” Kim C
  • “Definitely informative – practical info that will definitely be used and referred to in class and future art works.  Great to learn basics.”  Stephanie M
  • “Really helpful learning, fun and relaxed environment.  I’d definitely recommend this workshop to others.  The stand out for me? ‘The Book’ – a great reference to keep and the ‘hands on’ which helped to bring the learning to life. ” Marg H

No More Mud – Colour Mixing Workbook

I am excited to announce my first e-book the No More Mud – colour mixing workbook.

This Workbook is a definitive guide to understanding the complexities of colour mixing, in a simple step by step format. It demystifies a subject that has many beginning and self-taught artists shaking their heads at their colour mixing results.

Colour mixing workbook

Working from the colour mixing workbook

There are many hands on exercises to do in the workbook and if you follow them in a sequential order, by the end of the book you will understand how to mix pure, or muddy colours at will.

The workbook looks at the flaws in the 3 primary colour system of mixing colours, promotes the 6 colour system and introduces the concept of colour buddies. The colour buddy system helps you get your head around what is going on ‘ínside’ the colours you are mixing, which leads to integrating the material in a more easily remembered fashion.  

As well as the above basics of colour mixing, the book takes a look at the all important aspect of tone and the nature and use of complementary colours.

 

This e-book comes in an A6 landscape format and can easily be printed out, cut in half and put together.

 

This Weeks Question: Do you really understand colour mixing and would you like an easy way to understand it?

Look For Next Week’s Post:An artist’s life is a complex thing.

 


Colour Mixing – BLUES

What you need to know about colour mixing Blues before you start.

mixing Blues

Warm and cool Blues

French Ultramarine (Hidden Violet)
This Violet biased Blue is semi transparent and contains a large amount of Violet. When you compare
it to a green biased blue you can definitely see the Violet colour within it. Ultramarine Blue was
– according to Ralph Mayer – originally made from ground and refined Lapis Lazuli and therefore
one of the most costly of art materials. Even more confusing is the fact that some paint manufacturers
put out an Ultramarine (Red Shade) and an Ultramarine (Green Shade).
Cerulean Blue (Hidden Green)
This Green biased Blue is semi opaque and contains a large amount of Green. When you compare
it to the Violet biased Blue you can see the Green colour within it. Cerulean Blue is a fairly weak
colour and while great for skies, I tend to use a Pthalo Blue if I am needing more intensity.
The green biased blue family seems to have more colours in it than all the other colours – the main ones  are – Pthalo Blue, Winsor Blue, Cerulean Blue, Prussian Blue and Manganese Blue.

This week’s Question: Can you look at your paint charts and identify which bias each of your blues has – does it have a violet or a green bias?

Next Thursday’s Post: Songs of The Sea

Next Monday’s Post: Guerrilla Marketing for creatives

Posted By: Kadira Jennings

Mixing Colours YELLOWS

What you need to know about yellow before you start mixing colours

Mixing Yellows

Mixing colours Yellows

Cadmium Yellow (Hidden Orange)
This Orange biased Yellow is opaque and contains a large amount of
Orange. When you compare it to a Green biased Yellow you can definitely see the Orange
colour within it. Even though Cadmium Yellow is also from the cadmium heavy
metal family, it’s toxicity is so low as to hardly register and it too is considered quite
safe whilst bound into a paint medium.
Lemon Yellow (Hidden Green)
This Green biased Yellow is very transparent and contains a large amount of Green.
When you compare it to the Orange biased Yellow you can see the way it leans towards
Green.

This weeks Question: Can you look at your paint charts and identify which bias each of your yellows has – does it have a green or orange biased?

Next Thursday’s Post: Waitete Revisited

Next Monday’s Post: The Creative Process continued

Posted By: Kadira Jennings

Colour Theory

I am going to make this the first in a series of posts on colour theory that I will do over the next few months. I trust that over the course of these articles, you will gain a deeper understanding of why you are ending up with the mixing results that you are getting, and how to get closer to the colour you are aiming for. The first place to start is really with your tubes of paint. I have an exercise for you. I want you to get out every tube of paint or stick of colour that you have and make a chart of them all.  Keep all the colours together in their hue or colour family ie – red – see chart below.

Colour theory - The Reds

The Reds

This does two things for you.  Firstly it lets you see at a glance all the different colours you have, which makes matching and choosing colours easier. Secondly you can compare your different reds etc to see what their colour bias is (more on that later).

This weeks Question: Have you  got your paints out yet and made those charts?

Next Thursday’s Post: The Dance of Life

Next Monday’s Post: Colour Theory Part Two

Posted By: Kadira Jennings

Color mixing  – trial and error or what?

Color mixing is one of the most elusive aspects of painting. There is so much bad information about it – everywhere.  Most of the UTube videos you watch tell you only half the story and the books on the subject are not much better.  There are very few easy to read and correct books out there on colour theory, despite the fact that there are so many of them.

This year I am going to gradually cover some aspects of this tricky subject in the hope that it may be of some help to those of you who have only a glimmering of an idea of what is really going on.

Today is just a little taste to whet your appetite and I’m going to talk about greens.  How many of you reach for a tube of store bought green when you need a green, only to find its just not quite the right shade you need and you have no clue how to get that beautiful lime green or turquoise you are needing.

To take control of your greens your color mixing skills may need a bit of a polish up.  Here’s what I’d like you to do.

Go and get your paints and get out every blue  and yellow  that you have in your paint box.

Now you need to sort them into 4 separate piles.

  1. Pile one – all the warm blues or blues that tend towards red – ie they contain a lot of violet – eg Ultramarine Blue, Cobalt Blue.
  2. Pile two – all the cool blues or blues that tend towards green ie they contain a lot of green – eg. Pthalo Blue, Cerulean, Prussian blue, Winsor Blue, Manganese Blue.
  3. Pile three – all the cool yellows or yellows that tend towards green ie they contain a lot of green – eg. Lemon Yellow, Cadmium yellow Pale ( tends more to a cool than a warm) Winsor Lemon, Aurolean
  4. Pile four –  all the warm yellows or yellows that tend towards red – ie they contain a lot of orange – eg. Cadmium Yellow, Cadmium Yellow Deep,

Now the key to mixing the green you want is to understand the secondary color that your blue or yellow is carrying. If you are wanting to mix bright clear greens then you need to mix colors that both have green as their secondary colour.

For example to get the brightest color green possible you would need to mix Pthalo Blue and Lemon Yellow.  Both these colours carry large amounts of extra greens within them and don’t have other colors in large enough quantities to muddy things up .

Below is a quick chart  of the colors I have on hand and what happens when you mix them.  Notice that I have labelled which yellows are cool and which ones warm etc.

Color Mixing - Greens

Mixing Greens

 

There is no such thing as a bad  color.  It merely is not the correct color,  not the one that you want.  I trust that my post has shown you how you can mix up any number of greens.  Let me know how you got on.

Look For Thursday’s Post: A new direction in my work

Next Monday’s Post: Enhancing Creativity

Post by : Kadira Jennings

 

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