Discover New Insights By Mentoring Others

Discover New Insights By Mentoring OthersDiscover New Insights By Mentoring Others

Mentoring others. This is something we can all do no matter what stage of life we are at or what our life path is. Mentoring is a great way for us to understand what we know about ourselves and the subject at hand. If you have never taught I believe that mentoring is invaluable in discovering more about your own journey. Here are some key points about mentoring…..

  • If you are a creative who teaches, then you are already mentoring others.
  • Traditionally mentoring was a non paid activity, where you took  someone under your wing and showed them the ropes.
  • It is not dissimilar to an apprenticeship. However, apprentices are usually paid a small amount and in return they perform some of the more menial tasks of the job.
  • If you cannot afford to pay an apprentice you may still find that there are those new to your profession who will appreciate a hand in learning the basics, and who are willing to help you with the tasks of your art business in return.
  • The fact is, that you are teaching them what they need to know from the invaluable perspective of  where you have been. You are able to help them through the minefield of mistakes you have already made so they do not have to make them.
  • All importantly, you are showing them what works and what doesn’t.

Not only should you consider mentoring others, I would ask whether or not you have a mentor yourself. Sometimes a mentor may be found not in a single person, but rather, within the supportive environment of an online group. There are many of these on Facebook. Obviously you will need to test the waters so to speak, for  while where are some amazing groups out there, there are also many that are not so good. The other thing these groups are good for is extending your network and increasing your own support system.

Mentoring Others

Mentoring Others

For an in-depth analysis of the benefits of mentoring others I suggest you take a look at this page on mentoring others.  Although it is written from a business perspective, it gives you many ideas to think about.

 

This Weeks Question: Do you need to find a mentor for yourself or to become one?

Next Weeks Post: Exhibiting – how to find the perfect space?

 

Pic Credits: Photo by leovalente

How To Get Your Art Biz On Track Now!

Get your art biz on track. Are you an artist or creative  entrepreneur? Are you struggling with the biz side of things and are quite frankly feeling like – ‘I’d RATHER be in the studio’. There is so much to do when you are an artpreneur. After all you are not just being an artist and creating wonderful creations, you are also a business person and if you’re anything like me there are times when you need help with that. Even the top people in their fields have mentors. So do you have one? Or perhaps a business coach?

Get Your Art Biz On Track,Crista Cloutier,working artist
Many artists feel quite overwhelmed when it comes to getting the art out the studio door, and I’ve been no exception to that one. I have done a few different online business courses for artists and today I’d like to share with you the one that I think is the top of the pick.
This course,The Working Artist, is run by Crista Cloutier. What is unique about her is that she has been on both sides of the art world. She began her career, working in a fine art print gallery in the United States. She ended up managing this gallery and later moved on to start her own gallery. She is also an artist herself and therefore has a unique perspective, being able to understand the art world from both points of view.

She says, “My gift lies in empowering artists like you to gain the clarity, direction, and focus to transform your art-making practice into an authentic and rewarding career. You can have sell-out shows, have work collected by museums, and draw a faithful collector base. This is an incredible time to be an artist! “

Get Your Art Biz On Track,Crista Cloutier,working artist

Crista Cloutier

I took her online course last year and found it to be the best I have ever done.  It wasn’t that I didn’t know much of the material she presented, rather I think a large contributing factor was the way it was delivered.  Her ‘Working Artist’ platform, is the best on-line platform I have ever worked with.  It allowed me to proceed at my own pace and yet also had a great accountability tool, which I am still using to keep track of where I’m at and what I still need to do. I also had the opportunity to have a personal coaching call with her, where we went over my art biz with a fine tooth comb.  This was invaluable! Crista delivers everything and much more than she promises. 

If you are interested, and want to get your art biz on track, join her mailing list to get an update on when her next course is scheduled for. She also has a great blog, called Jump, packed with information for working artists. I highly recommend this course.

This Weeks Question: Do you need to learn more about the business of being an artist?

Next Weeks Post: A new series of work coming up!

 

Photo by RichardBowen

What is the secret to Intuitive Marketing?

Did you know there is such thing as intuitive marketing? Sometimes people get a bit funny when you talk about intuition, they think it is just a woman thing. However if  you speak to many entrepreneurs, you will discover that at the end of the day they rely quite heavily on their intuition. And whats more they will tell you that they rely on it to help them to make good decisions in their businesses. First they listen to advice from others and then follow their intuition on that advice.

Intuitive marketing, Intuition

I did a course recently on intuitive marketing and it can be applied to any business. In fact it can be applied to any area of your life really, well the intuition part. I believe that artists should be very good at this form of marketing, as many of us rely on our intuitive responses to the canvas as we paint. It is something that we get good at over time listening to that feeling, is this a good move or bad one?

So how can we apply it to the marketing process. Well it is all about decisions really. And those decisions rely on questions. The better the quality of your questions the better your intuitive decisions will be. How does this process work?

Let’s look at an example. You may have a choice of two galleries you want to submit your work to,  so the question to ask in this case would be…..

How successful will my art business be in 5 years time if, I sign up with Gallery A? Now, as you ask this question, you need to pay careful attention to how you feel. What you need to be aware of when you ask the question is, do you feel a heaviness around that question, or in your body, or does your mind feel cloudy or heavy when you think about that option? Or does it feel light, do you feel energized and eager to move forward with it? Then go through the same process for gallery B and compare your feelings related to the two galleries. Decide which feels lighter and follow the lightness.

And that’s it! I know it just sounds deceptively simple, however, don’t be fooled, this is a very powerful technique! 

Also don’t leave out the 5 years piece either.  This is an essential part of what helps us to tap into that intuitive stream, as it takes us out of focusing on short-term fears and problems or even goals, that may be leading us in the wrong direction.

The key to it is learning to feel which question feels heavier and which one feels lighter.  And the process can be done for anything at all, with a little tweaking of the question.

This Weeks Question: What marketing decision are you making this year that you could apply the intuitive marketing process to??

Look For Next Week’s PostWhat Is The Art of Buying Art?

 

The Opening,exhibition opening,kadira_jennings,ruby+samaadahi+gallery

The Opening

 

A Fantastic Exhibition Opening

Well the day finally arrived! So much work, and then the party! No wonder we artists need a party to celebrate the hanging of an exhibition. After weeks of isolation as we diligently paint away and push nosy people out the studio door – especially spouses and children. I call them the Time Vampires. Its amazing how many people want to come and chat while you’re trying to paint. If you’re feeling nice you might mumble a reply, grunt or nod your head at the appropriate places. However if the painting is misbehaving, you will probably yell at them to get-out and give you some space, and they will slink off with hurt feelings. Sigh!

exhibition opening,kadira_jennings,ruby_samadahi_gallery

The Gallery

The show was opened by celebrated Newcastle Artist, John Morris who has many gongs to his name, including winner of the Gosford, Norville and Maitland Art Prizes.  He has also been a selected finalist in many other competitions. John spoke about … The processes and development of an artists vision.  He stated that the artist always puts a part of themselves out there on show  and that there is no way they can avoid doing so. Before he spoke, I introduced refugee worker Pari, to speak a little on the refugee situation here on the Central Coast and the work they do.

There was a great turn out. – Thank you all for coming and making it a great success. 

A special thanks go to Ava and Prue  who both bought art works…. and several people purchased prints and cards of the works.

I am thrilled with the way the exhibition looks.  The interesting thing is that once all the works are in place the exhibition seems to take on an energy of its own. It is not just a collection of single works, the theme pulls them together and a bit like a symphony orchestra it creates something greater than itself.

I would like to thank everyone who helped me make this event possible, Simone Dennis – the gallery owner, John Morris, Pari  and Chay my daughter for her help with doing all the fiddly things like putting strings on the backs of paintings and painting around the sides of all the works, Esther, Hannah and Prue for taking photos, my partner John for helping with transport and putting the triptych together and everyone who turned up to support me.  I really appreciate each and everyone of you – Thank you.

3 Keys To Success In The Studio When You Are Gearing Up For An Exhibition.
keys to success,Exhibition preparations,refugees,soloexhibition

My weekly plans for the last 8 weeks before the exhibition

 

  1. Well, of all the keys to success, number one would be planning. A good six months before hand if possible. And of course the very first item would be planning the theme of your show. The image above also shows lists of all the tasks that need to be done, broken down into groups of tasks.
  2. Then there’s having the work done at least three weeks ahead of hanging time if you are working in oils – even longer if you use really thick paint.
  3. Asking for help with things that others can do such as , putting the cords and tape on the back of the works, labelling them, writing inventories and so on.

 

keys to success,Exhibition preparations,refugees,soloexhibition

Exhibition preparations – get help

 

Of course there are many more elements involved in having a solo exhibition

Most people have no idea what goes into preparing a solo exhibition.  Basically it is a mini or bigger event that has may details that need to be attended to.

keys to success,Exhibition preparations,refugees,soloexhibition

Matting the prints – tools of the trade

 

Yesterday I began preparing prints for the exhibition.  They have to be matted and shrink wrapped.

 

keys to success,Exhibition preparations,refugees,soloexhibition

Exhibition preparations

 

This Weeks Question: Have you visited any exhibitions lately that stood out for you and what was it that caught your attention?

Look For Next Week’s PostMore preparation for the exhibition

A New Body Of Work

 

If you’ve been following the blog in the last couple of weeks you will know that I’ve been sharing with you some of the different series of works I have painted and how they came about. Today I would like to share with you the latest body of work which is centred around exploring current issues and challenges facing displaced persons and refugees.
This new body of work, examines the underlying problems facing them and their hopes for a better life.

Where can you see it? – it will be exhibited at the Ruby Samadhi gallery in Kincumber  When can you see it? – 1 December to 31 December 2016, more details to follow.

As with some previous bodies of work, this one did not emerge from my fascination with a particular subject or in this case even a conscious awareness around the topic.

I had recently come back from a trip to New Zealand and as I was about to begin a new series of work I thought I would try to loosen up my style somewhat. Although I enjoyed the previous series of works which were floral in nature, by the time I got to the end of that series my work had become quite tight and I wanted to remedy that.  I picked a palette of colours and started splashing paint around, endeavouring to work very intuitively and abstractly.  However as the work progressed I began to see figures emerging from within it.

body of work,Refugee,Kadira Jennings,refugees

The first painting in the series

When the painting was nearly done I was wondering what title to give it when the word refugee popped into my head. At the time I couldn’t figure why, why refugee??? Although the figures in the middle of the painting do look very frightened and harrowed.
A short while later, I was talking to one of my students about the painting. We had previously been discussing how I would like to return to live in New Zealand as I currently live in Australia. At this point in time however, that is not an option for me. When I was telling her about the painting being called Refugee, she looked at me and looked at the painting and said ‘but you’re a refugee, aren’t you? ‘ I was quite astonished as I’d never thought of myself as such.
This got me to thinking further about refugees and displaced persons and so the birth of a new series began. I then quickly developed several paintings from this first one. These subsequent works related to the emotional challenges and hopes that a refugee or displaced person feels.  I feel like a displaced person rather than a refugee. The thing we share in common is being cut off from our homeland, although perhaps in different ways.  

After that I turned to my source material, the photos I had taken on my recent trip to New Zealand and it all began to come together. 

Next week I will share further highlights of this journey as we approach the count down to an exhibition of them.

 

This Weeks Question: What can we do individually to help alleviate the misery of refugees in our own country.

Look For Next Week’s Post: Why Go To An Art Fair – 3 Fantastic Reasons Why You Should

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